The Vanishing Half

I knew The Vanishing Half by Brit Bennett was going to be a good read. I didn’t account for “good” not being a strong enough qualifier for how amazing this book really is. Bennett is a genius at telling stories, weaving together multiple points of view, and creating characters who jump off the page.

The relationship between twins has always fascinates me, and The Vanishing Half takes this relationship one step further – what if one twin chooses to abandon a part of herself that is inherent to them both? This book explores race, colorism, sisterhood, and gender issues with eloquence and an unflinching grace.

The Mothers

Friendship, love triangles, maternal relationships, and an undercurrent of religion and matriarchal observations. That’s what Ms. Bennett presents to us in The Mothers while gifting us with her beautiful prose and complex characters.

I felt empathy for each of the main characters – Nadia, Aubrey, and Luke – while reading this book. I felt for their decisions and their questions of what-could-have-been. The Mothers’ voices were strong as well, and I enjoyed how fully developed the supporting players were – like Nadia’s dad, Robert.

This is a character-driven novel about decisions, loss, and moving forward. A recommended read from me!

Meg and Jo

A Modern Retelling of Little Women

Louisa May Alcott’s classic tale of the March sisters gets an update for the next generation in this delightful book. I’ve loved the story of Little Women since I was 10, so I have been eager to read Virginia Kantra’s book, Meg & Jo, ever since it was published. I’m happy to report that I was not disappointed in it! Kantra accomplished the job of sharing the 21st-century struggles of women dealing with jobs, family, and love while still keeping the essence of the classic characters. Meg Brooke and Jo March are unique and yet universal.

I gave this book 5 stars and look forward to reading the sequel, Beth & Amy, when it’s released!

The quilt in this picture is made from squares sewn by my Great Great Aunt Alice. As you can see, it has been well-loved and used for many years.

Welcome to the United States of Anxiety

Celebrating the Release of a Great New Book by One of My Favorite Authors

Book Review: The United States of Anxiety by Jen Lancaster

Jen Lancaster is the queen of witty self-reflection. I’ve loved her books since first reading Bitter is the New Black over a decade ago. She started as a blogger and then memoir writer who seamlessly crossed the boundaries into contemporary fiction and now, with her newest book, brings her social commentary to new heights with Welcome to the United States of Anxiety.

This is a great book, friends. As Lancaster walks us through how we’re addressing Maslow’s hierarchy of needs in the 21st century, she blends her craft of humor and storytelling with real-world issues and fact-based research. The result? A five-star read that made me feel like I’m not alone in my anxiety while watching the world’s events in 2020.